$JCP News: The 100 Macy’s stores to close will be announced after Christmas

www.philly.c…
When it announced the 100 closures Aug. 11, Macy’s said it would focus on its e-commerce strategy, as the Gap and JCPenney have done. They, too, are shedding stores as more shoppers migrate online. At Macy’s, online sales saw 15 percent growth last year …

via @theloop: When iTunes and iOS don’t agree on how much free space an iPhone has

www.loopinsi…

I recently checked my iPhone’s Storage & iCloud Usage settings, and it said that I didn’t have a lot of space left. On this 64GB device—which, according to the iPhone, only really has 55.5GB—there was only 696MB available.

iphone storage

But then I synced the iPhone with iTunes. The latter showed me how much free space it thought I had: 2.68GB. And it also said that the iPhone’s capacity is 55.7GB, or 200MB more than what the phone itself says.

itunes iphone storage

Is my iPhone crying “Wolf?”

I sync my iPhone often enough that I generally have an idea when I’m about to run out of free space. I try to leave at least 1 or 2GB free so I can add a bunch of new music when I want, or download some new apps or podcasts. So I was surprised when my iPhone showed so little free space available. Presented with two numbers, how do I know which is correct?

I set up a test: I tried to sync the first season of Fawlty Towers to my iPhone. If iTunes was able to sync those six episodes, which take up 2.02GB, then the amount of free space on the iPhone would clearly be wrong.

And indeed it was; I put those videos on my iPhone, and afterwards iTunes told me I had 1.36GB available, whereas the iPhone told me that one or more items was not synced, and that I should check in iTunes to find out what didn’t copy. iTunes displayed no error message at all. I tried one more time, and iTunes synced that final episode, telling me that I now had 965MB free, but the iPhone said ominously, “0 bytes.”

0 bytes

Much has been written about storage on the iPhone. For a while, people with the least capacious models had trouble updating iOS. Apple made a change in the way updates were managed in iOS 9 to allow them to be installed with less free space. And if you have a 16GB iOS device, you will pretty much always be short on space.

Two years ago, I did a test: I took a 16GB iPad and installed everything that Apple recommends on it. There was just over 8GB available, which is barely enough to install the HD version of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, or only four episodes of The West Wing.

Most everyone who syncs an iOS device with iTunes knows about the infamous “Other” storage. At times, iTunes tells you that need many more storage space to sync what you’ve selected. When you look at the capacity bar in iTunes, you see a very long yellow section at the right, which represents “Other.” No one knows exactly what is in that “Other” storage, and it’s possible that the iPhone cleared some of it the second time I synced to allow that final episode to be copied to my device.

But my current problem is more annoying. If I want to download a large app or a new video, my iPhone tells me that I cannot do so. But iTunes tells me that I can add more files. How can I find out who is telling the truth? There is no reason why these two numbers should be any different; surely Apple can figure out a method for both iTunes and an iOS device to calculate this free space the same way.

After doing these tests, I deleted Fawlty Towers and my iPhone then told me that I had 2.3GB free. Of course, iTunes said that the same device had 2.98GB free. Back to square one.

via @daringfireball: University of Chicago Strikes Back Against Campus Political Correctness


Conservatives have been the loudest critics of campus political correctness, and hailed the Chicago statement as a victory. Mary Katharine Ham, a senior writer for The Federalist, a conservative website, wrote that it was “a sad commentary on higher education that this is considered a brave and bold move, but it is, and the University of Chicago should be applauded mightily for stating what used to be obvious.”

But while conservatives often frame campus free speech as a left-versus-right issue, the dispute is often within the left.

“Historically, the left has been much more protective of academic freedom than the right, particularly in the university context,” said Geoffrey R. Stone, a University of Chicago law professor who specializes in free speech issues. Conservatives “suddenly became the champions of free speech, which I find is a bit ironic, but the left is divided.”

Mr. Lukianoff said he and his group are often mistakenly called conservative, adding, “I’m a former A.C.L.U. person who worked in refugee camps.”

The dispute over free speech has ricocheted off campuses and around the country. In a commencement speech this year at Howard University, President Obama said: “Don’t try to shut folks out, don’t try to shut them down, no matter how much you might disagree with them. There’s been a trend around the country of trying to get colleges to disinvite speakers with a different point of view, or disrupt a politician’s rally. Don’t do that — no matter how ridiculous or offensive you might find the things that come out of their mouths.”

President Obama Delivers the Commencement Address at Howard University Video by The White House

The University of Chicago has long been associated with the conservative school of economics that is named for it. It also takes pride in a history of free expression, like allowing the Communist Party candidate for president, William Z. Foster, to speak on the ornate neo-Gothic campus on the city’s South Side in 1932, despite fierce criticism.

Mr. Obama taught constitutional law at the university law school.

The university said Friday that Dean Ellision and the university president, Robert R. Zimmer, were not available to discuss the letter or what prompted it, but Mr. Manier referred queries to Professor Stone, a former university provost.

Last year, a faculty Committee on Freedom of Expression, appointed by Dr. Zimmer and headed by Professor Stone, produced a report stating that “it is not the proper role of the university to attempt to shield individuals from ideas and opinions they find unwelcome, disagreeable, or even deeply offensive.”

“We didn’t feel we were doing something, internal to the University of Chicago, that was in any way radical or different,” Professor Stone said Friday. It is clear that some colleges are retreating from the same free speech values, he said, “but my guess, if you asked most of these institutions 10 or 20 years ago, they would have said more or less what we said in our statement.”

Since Professor Stone’s committee produced its report, several other universities, including Princeton, Purdue, Columbia and the University of Wisconsin system, have adopted similar policies or statements, some of them taken almost verbatim from the report. And this week’s letter to University of Chicago freshmen draws from that and specifically cites the report as embodying the university’s point of view.

Many academics say the concerns reflected in the University of Chicago letter, while real, are overblown. “I asked faculty if any had ever been asked to give trigger warnings,” said Dr. Roth, of Wesleyan. “I think one person said they had.”

There often seems to be a generational divide on campus speech — young people demanding greater sensitivity, and their elders telling them to get thicker skins — but a survey by the Knight Foundation and Gallup gives a murkier picture. It found that 78 percent of college students said they preferred a campus “where students are exposed to all types of speech and viewpoints,” including offensive and biased speech, over a campus where such speech is prohibited. Students were actually more likely to give that response than adults generally.

But when asked specifically about “slurs and other language on campus that is intentionally offensive to certain groups,” 69 percent of college students said that colleges should be allowed to impose restrictions on such expression.

Eric Holmberg, the student body president at the University of Chicago, said the letter suggested that administrators “don’t understand what a trigger warning is,” and seemed “based on this false narrative of coddled millennials.”

“It’s an effort to frame any sort of activism on campus as anti-free-speech, just young people who are upset,” Mr. Holmberg said, “when in reality I’d say the administration is far more fearful of challenge than any student I know.”

Sara Zubi, a Chicago junior majoring in public policy, said the dean’s letter seemed contrary to some of the support programs the university has created or endorsed, like a “safe space program” for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. “To say the university doesn’t support that is really hypocritical and contradictory,” she said, “and it also just doesn’t make sense.”

Christopher Mele and Megan Thee-Brenan contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on August 27, 2016, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: University of Chicago Rebels Against Moves to Stifle Speech. Order Reprints| Today’s Paper|Subscribe

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via @engadget: VW aims for an EV that goes 300 miles on a 15-minute charge

www.engadget…

In the wake of its emissions scandal and lawsuit with US authorities, German automaker Volkswagen has been pushing its electric concept vehicles and rushing its 84-mile-per-battery E-Golf into the consumer market. But for range and convenience rivaling Tesla’s lineup, VW’s first entry in its next generation of EV will be revealed to the public at the Paris motor show in October, a company chairman told German magazine WirstschaftWoche. While the car’s compact Golf-like size combined with the roomy Passat-like interior space is promising, the real kicker is the recharge speed the company’s engineers are aiming for: Plug the car in for 15 minutes and it should be able to drive for 300 miles.

That’s the plan, VW Group CEO Matthias Müller confirmed to Autocar, with a pricetag they hope to be lower than a comparable combustion-engine car. Which will be wonderful if it arrives from the production line as advertised at the end of 2018 or beginning of 2019, a hopeful date mentioned by the chairman, though Müller only affirmed a 2025 target for the car’s release. But even the Tesla Supercharger can only manage to refill 50 percent of its battery after 20 minutes, equivalent to 115 to 126 miles. The range VW is boasting is in line with their estimates for that of its Modular Electric Platform (MEB) proposed for its BUDD-e microbus concept back in January, which claimed to charge 80 percent of its 373-mile maximum in 15 minutes.

The VW-owned Porsche boasted the same rate for its sportsy Model E electric car, which they announced would roll off assembly lines in 2019. But as TechCrunch points out, further research into and technical development of an 800-volt charging method is necessary for the performance vehicle to reach that refilling speed. Meanwhile, Tesla’s existing Model S can net up to 58 miles per hour from a 240-volt socket and an aftermarket second in-car charger, hitting its own 80 percent mark in about four hours. It’s not up to the rate that VW is claiming, but it’s a tested standard without additional infrastructure or a dedicated Supercharger station.

Regardless, the VW chairman told WirstschaftWoche that the unnamed EV sedan will be the first in a lineup of "New Urban Vehicles" designed to use MEB. It will include a city-ready SUV, a coupe, a small delivery van akin to the previously-announced BUDD-e concept minibus and a luxury sedan.

Via: TechCrunch

Source: Autocar

$JCP News: Lampert loans Sears $300M

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While Macy’s and Target also reported challenging quarters, Walmart, JCPenney and TJX Cos. are posting strong sales. Sears is attempting to transform its retail operations into a membership-based business rooted in the Shop Your Way rewards program and is …

$JCP News: JCPenney’s Losses Shrink, Set To Be Profitable By The End Of Year


JCPenney’s Losses Shrink, Set To Be Profitable By The End Of Year


JCPenney is back on the path to profitability. According to Reuters, the department store’s quarterly losses more than halved as JCPenney cut costs and saw higher sales of footwear and home goods in its stores (plus beauty products, thanks to sales at …

$JCP News: McDonald’s Rating Cut On Sales, Labor Costs; Lululemon, JCPenney Targets Raised


McDonald’s Rating Cut On Sales, Labor Costs; Lululemon, JCPenney Targets Raised


McDonald’s (MCD) and Best Buy (BBY) were downgraded Monday, while Lululemon (LULU) and JCPenney (JCP) saw their price targets raised, and Valeant (VRX) was upgraded to buy. McDonald’s was downgraded to hold from buy at Argus. The fast-food giant’s profit …